Tag Archives: Sermon

Sermon – Crisis? What Crisis?

1 Thessalonians 4.13-18 and Matthew 25.1-13 A note from Jamie Howison: A serious nod is due to Bishop N.T. Wright, for his article “Farewell to the Rapture,” published in Bible Review in August 2001 and accessible from the NT Wright Page.  And of

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Sermon – Mount Nebo

Sermon on Deuteronomy 34.1-12 A note from Jamie Howison: This sermon includes something of a landmark quote from the final speech delivered by Martin Luther King, Jr. Audio of that speech is included in this post, and I’d highly recommend you

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“To God the things that are God’s”

A Sermon on Matthew 22:15-22 I n our cultural context, conversations about money tend often to be awkward, and even more so when that “conversation” comes in the shape of a sermon. Money is a hot button topic, but this

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Thanksgiving?

A Sermon on Matthew 22.1-14 I ’m not sure if you arrived here tonight expecting a Thanksgiving service, with scripture readings emphasizing the bounty of the harvest, God’s goodness, and a general spirit of thankfulness; if you did, the two

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The landlord and the tenants

This sermon from October 2nd was preached by Jaylene Johnson A sermon on Exodus 20:1-20 and Matthew 21:33-46 M y four-year-old niece is quickly becoming one of the most quotable people in my life. A few weeks ago, she was

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Sermon – The man who had two sons

In the context of worship on Sunday September 25, we offered a simple liturgy of blessing for the marriage of Jaylene Johnson and Scott Urwin. This sermon on the parable of the man who had two sons (Matthew 21:23-32) ends

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“As a Gentile and a tax collector”

A sermon on Matthew 18:15-20 F irst of all, a bit of an apology. The way the lectionary cycle of readings is set up, the next several weeks are going present this preacher with a serious conundrum. Week after week,

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Sermon – I will be there

A Sermon on Exodus 3:1-15 A few back weeks back when I was winding up a series of sermons based in Paul’s epistle to the Romans, I made the observation that as a preacher I tend to be drawn to

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I do not understand my actions.

A sermon on Romans 7:15-25a O ver the next month and a half, the lectionary cycle of readings will take us into the Letter of Paul to the Romans. I’m not sure why the lectionary designers thought it a good idea

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“No wonder we love circuses…”

An introductory note: This sermon contains an extended excerpt from Robert Farrar Capon’s book, The Third Peacock. While this excerpt places a great deal of emphasis on the goodness and delight of creation, it is important to note that the subtitle of Capon’s

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We Are All Pentecostals

Sermon – We are all Pentecostals… T hough tonight we’re gathered together in an Anglican context, using the liturgical prayers of the Anglican tradition, we’re all Pentecostals. Though many here are more likely to self-identify as Mennonite or maybe Baptist

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Sermon – “In whom we live”

a sermon on Acts 17:22-34 W henever I am called upon to open a meeting with prayer, I almost always find myself  beginning with something like this: “Almighty God, still the hearts and minds of your people gathered here, and make

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Sermon – “Greater Works than these”

A sermon on Acts 7:55-60 and John 14:1-14 A fter hearing that reading from the Gospel according to John, I have a question or two that I would really like to ask Jesus. I suppose that puts me in pretty

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